Monday, December 17, 2012

Federalist Papers



Federalist Papers



Alexander Hamilton - John Jay - James Madison

 THE FEDERALIST 


Forgotten Founders Corporation 
Copyright © Stan Klos, President Who? Forgotten Founders 2004 & 2008 

The Federalist Papers were published and sold by John and Andrew M'Lean as a collected work as the “The Federalist: a collection of essays, written in favor of the new Constitution, as agreed upon by the Federal convention, September 17, 1787,” New York Printed, 1788.  The work consists of 85   essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay promoting the ratification of the U.S. Constitution of 1787. Seventy-seven of the essays were published serially in The Independent Journal and The New York Packet between October of 1787 and August 1788. 



By: Stanley Yavneh Klos

  • First United American Republic: United Colonies of North America: 13 British Colonies United in Congress was founded by 12 colonies on September 5th, 1774 (Georgia joined in 1775)  and governed through a British Colonial Continental Congress.  Peyton Randolph and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief;
  • Second United American Republic: The United States of America: 13 Independent States United in Congress was founded by 12 states on July 2nd, 1776 (New York abstained until July 8th), and governed through the United States Continental CongressJohn Hancock and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Third United American Republic: The United States of America: A Perpetual Union was founded by 13 States on March 1st, 1781, with the enactment of the first U.S. Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, and governed through the United States in Congress Assembled.  Samuel Huntington and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Fourth United American Republic: The United States of America: We the People  was formed by 11 states on March 4th, 1789 (North Carolina and Rhode Island joined in November 1789 and May 1790, respectively), with the enactment of the U.S. Constitution of 1787. The fourth and current United States Republic governs through  the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate in Congress Assembled, the U.S. President and Commander-in-Chief, and the U.S. Supreme Court.  George Washington served as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief.

 For More Information go to 
America's Four United Republics

#
Title
Author
Publication
Date
1
General  Introduction
Hamilton
Independent Journal
October 27, 1787
2
Part I: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
Jay
Independent Journal
October 31, 1787
3
Part II: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
Jay
Independent Journal
November 3, 1787
4
Part III: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
Jay
Independent Journal
November 7, 1787
5
Part IV: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
Jay
Independent Journal
November 10, 1787
6
Part I: Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
Hamilton
Independent Journal
November 14, 1787
7
Part II: Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
Hamilton
Independent Journal
November 15, 1787
8
The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States
Hamilton
NY Packet
November 20, 1787
9
Part I: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
Hamilton
Independent Journal
November 21, 1787
10
Part II: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
Madison
NY Packet
November 23, 1787
11
The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy
Hamilton
Independent Journal
November 24, 1787
12
The Utility of the Union in Respect to Revenue
Hamilton
NY Packet
November 27, 1787
13
Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government
Hamilton
Independent Journal
November 28, 1787
14
Objections to the Proposed Constitution from Extent of Territory Answered
Madison
NY Packet
November 30, 1787
15
Part I: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
Hamilton
Independent Journal
December 1, 1787
16
Part II: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
Hamilton
Independent Journal
December 4, 1787
17
Part III: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
Hamilton
Independent Journal
December 5, 1787
18
Part IV: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
Hamilton & Madison
Independent Journal
December 7, 1787
19
Part V: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
Hamilton & Madison
Independent Journal
December 8, 1787
20
Part VI: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
Hamilton & Madison
NY Packet
December 11, 1787
21
Part I: Other Defects of the Present Confederation
Hamilton
Independent Journal
December 11, 1787
22
Part II: Other Defects of the Present Confederation
Hamilton
NY Packet
December 14, 1787
23
The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union
Hamilton
NY Packet
December 17, 1787
24
Part I: The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
Hamilton
Independent Journal
December 18, 1787
25
Part II: The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
Hamilton
NY Packet
December 21, 1787
26
Part I: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
Hamilton
Independent Journal
December 22, 1787
27
Part II: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
Hamilton
NY Packet
December 25, 1787
28
Part III: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
Hamilton
Independent Journal
December 25, 1787
29
Concerning the Militia
Hamilton
Daily Advertiser
January 10, 1788
30
Part I: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Hamilton
NY Packet
December 28, 1787
31
Part II: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Hamilton
NY Packet
January 1, 1788
32
Part III: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Hamilton
Daily Advertiser
January 3, 1788
33
Part IV: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Hamilton
Daily Advertiser
January 3, 1788
34
Part V: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Hamilton
NY Packet
January 4, 1788
35
Part VI: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Hamilton
Independent Journal
January 5, 1788
36
Part VII: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Hamilton
NY Packet
January 8, 1788
37
Part I: Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government
Madison
Daily Advertiser
January 11, 1788
38
Part II: Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed
Madison
NY Packet
January 15, 1788
39
The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles
Madison
Independent Journal
January 18, 1788
40
The Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained
Madison
NY Packet
January 18, 1788
41
General View of the Powers Conferred by the Constitution
Madison
Independent Journal
January 18, 1788
42
Part I: The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered
Madison
NY Packet
January 22, 1788
43
Part II: The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered
Madison
Independent Journal
January 23, 1788
44
Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States
Madison
NY Packet
January 25, 1788
45
The Alleged Danger Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered
Madison
Independent Journal
January 26, 1788
46
The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared
Madison
NY Packet
January 29, 1788
47
The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts
Madison
NY Packet
February 1, 1788
48
These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other
Madison
NY Packet
February 1, 1788
49
Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 5, 1788
50
Periodic Appeals to the People Considered
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 5, 1788
51
The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 8, 1788
52
Part I: The House of Representatives
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 8, 1788
53
Part II: The House of Representatives
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 12, 1788
54
The Apportionment of Members Among the States
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 12, 1788
55
Part I: The Total Number of the House of Representatives
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 15, 1788
56
Part II: The Total Number of the House of Representatives
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 19, 1788
57
The Alleged Tendency of the Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation
Hamilton or Madison
NY Packet
February 19, 1788
58
Objection that the Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered
Madison
NY Packet
February 20, 1788
59
Part I: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
Hamilton
NY Packet
February 22, 1788
60
Part II: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
Hamilton
NY Packet
February 26, 1788
61
Part III: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
Hamilton
NY Packet
February 26, 1788
62
The Senate
Hamilton or Madison
Independent Journal
February 27, 1788
63
The Senate Continued
Hamilton or Madison
Independent Journal
March 1, 1788
64
The Powers of the Senate
Jay
NY Packet
March 7, 1788
65
The Powers of the Senate Continued
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 7, 1788
66
Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 11, 1788
67
The Executive Department
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 11, 1788
68
The Mode of Electing the President
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 14, 1788
69
The Real Character of the Executive
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 14, 1788
70
The Executive Department Further Considered
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 14, 1788
71
Part I: The Duration in Office of the Executive
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 18, 1788
72
Part II: Duration in Office of the Executive and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 21, 1788
73
The Provision for Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 21, 1788
74
The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive
Hamilton
NY Packet
March 25, 1788
75
The Treaty Making Power of the Executive
Hamilton
Independent Journal
March 26, 1788
76
The Appointing Power of the Executive
Hamilton
NY Packet
April 1, 1788
77
The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered
Hamilton
NY Packet
April 4, 1788
78
The Judiciary Department
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
May 28, 1788
79
The Judiciary Continued
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
May 28, 1788
80
The Powers of the Judiciary
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
June 21, 1788
81
The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of Judicial Authority
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
June 25, 1788
82
The Judiciary Continued
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
July 2, 1788
83
The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
July 5, 1788,
84
Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
July 16, 1788,
85
Concluding Remarks
Hamilton
McLEAN's Edition, NY
August 13, 1788










Book a primary source exhibit and a professional speaker for your next event by contacting Historic.us today. Our Clients include many Fortune 500 companies, associations, non-profits, colleges, universities, national conventions, pr and advertising agencies. As the leading exhibitor of primary sources, many of our clients have benefited from our historic displays that are designed to entertain and educate your target audience. Contact us to learn how you can join our "roster" of satisfied clientele today!



Historic.us

 
A Non-profit Corporation

Primary Source Exhibits

2000 Louisiana Avenue | Venue 15696
New Orleans, Louisiana, 70115

727-771-1776 | Exhibit Inquiries

202-239-1774 | Office

Dr. Naomi and Stanley Yavneh Klos, Principals

Naomi@Historic.us
Stan@Historic.us

Primary Source exhibits are available for display in your community. The costs range from $1,000 to $35,000 depending on length of time on loan and the rarity of artifacts chosen. 

Website: www.Historic.us

 


The Forgotten First Amendment - Please Ratify Now!
For more information go to Article the First




Middle and High School Curriculum Supplement

For More Information Click Here

U.S. Dollar Presidential Coin Mr. Klos vs Secretary Paulson - Click Here